'Chestnut Rose'

(Pronounced: CHEST-nut Rose)

ALSO KNOWN AS:

'Burr Rose' , 'Chestnut Rose' , R. microphylla , R. roxburghii , R. roxburghii plena , R. roxburghii roxburghii

 

'Chestnut Rose'

[Enlarged Image]

'Chestnut Rose', originated in China, and was introduced from the Botanic Garden at Calcutta around 1824. It is named for William Roxburgh who was superintendent.

 

'Chestnut Rose'

[Enlarged Image]

'Chestnut Rose' blooms are lilac-pink with plentiful gold stamens. They fade to near-white.

 

'Chestnut Rose'

[Enlarged Image]

This rose was originally identified by Lindley in 1820 from a Chinese painting and was given the name R. microphylla, but the name was changed when it was found that another unrelated European rose had already been given that name.

 

'Chestnut Rose'

[Enlarged Image]

'Chestnut Rose' starts blooming in early April in the Texas Hill Country. Unlike most species roses, it repeats sporadically throughout the summer and early fall.

 

'Chestnut Rose'

[Enlarged Image]

The covering of the buds, as visible in this picture, and subsequently the covering of the hips are characterized by bristles. It is this covering of bristles that gives rise to the common name of 'Chestnut Rose'.

 
 

 
GENERAL
INFORMATION:

The 'Chestnut Rose' originated in China and was known before 1824. It was brought to the Botanic Garden at Calcutta, India around 1824, from which it was introduced. It is named fopr William Roxburgh, who was superintendent of the gardens.

The double form of the 'Chestnut Rose' (R. roxburghii plena), which is somewhat less virogous than either of the other forms, produces slightly fragrant, very double, medium pink blooms in the spring.

The 'Chestnut Rose' is readily distinguished by its grayish-dark brown, exfoliating bark. During the winter, the plant seems entirely dead. Howevert it is, in fact, all but indestructable, and is a great starter rose for timid gardeners.

 
BOTANICAL
GROUP:

Platyrhodon

 
GROUP:

OGR

 
CLASS:

Sp

 
SEED
PARENT:

Unknown  

POLLEN
PARENT:

Unknown  

BREEDER:

Unknown  

INTRODUCED:

This rose was found in Canton, China in 1814, and had been cultivated there  

DATE:

Before 1814 [ England ]  

PLANT SIZE
AND FORM:

Height:    5 '     to    7 '           Width:    4 '     to    5 '



The 'Chestnut Rose' forms a mounding bush 5' - 7' high. and 4' - 5' wide, with stiff canes.  

FOLIAGE
DESCRIPTION:

The foliage is medium-green, and very small with as many as 15 evenly arranged, oval pointed leaflets on each leaf. The edges of the leaves are finely serrated, and the surfaces of the leaves are smooth. The floiage gives a nice autumn display.

The calyx and hips are both covered with prickly spines that resemble the fruits of chestnut trees. The 'Chestnut Rose' foliage is dark green, rough, and relatively small. The leaves normally have seven or nine leaflets.

 
FOLIAGE
FRAGRANCE:

None.  

BLOOM
FREQUENCY:

R - Repeat. 'Chestnut Rose' starts blooming in early April in the Texas Hill Country. Unlike most species roses, it repeats sporadically throughout the summer and early fall.

 
BLOOM
DESCRIPTION:
Flower Size:    2.00"      to      3.00"           Cluster Size:    1      to      3           Petal Count:    40 to 60          

The 'Chestnut Rose' blooms are double (over 40 petals), medium sized (2" - 3") and borne often solitary on short pedicles.

 
BLOOM
COLOR:

mp - Medium Pink. 'Chestnut Rose' blooms are lilac-pink with plentiful gold stamens. The flowers fade to near-white.

 
COLOR VARIATION:

None  

FRAGRANCE:

sf - Slightly Fragrant.The 'Chestnut Rose' has little discernable fragrance.

 
HIPS:

The hips are large and initially green. They turn orange-yellow as they ripen. They resemble miniature chestnuts and are covered with tiny prickles. Hence, the common name, 'Chestnut Rose'.

 
CLIMATE:

Zones 6 - 9  

CULTURE:

The 'Chestnut Rose' likes moist well-drained soils and does not like to have its roots disturbed. If left undisturbed, it will live for a very long time, even without care and attention.

The 'Chestnut Rose' Will tolerage some shade. It is very disease resistant, but some have reported it to have low resistance to blackspot. Little or no pruning is required except to remove dead wood.

 
PROPAGATION:

This rose is easily propagated from cuttings.

 
OTHER
CHARACTERISTICS:


    ** Tolerant of shade
    ** Tolerant of poorer soils
    ** Good display of autumn foliage
    ** Worth growing for ornimental value of hips
    ** Suitable for planting in woodlands settings
    ** Availability is limited

This rose forms an extremely dense mounding shrub. If planted in shade, it will be much smaller than if it is planted in full sun. It has nice autumn foliage, and very interesting bracts and hips.

The canes are a tawny brown, turning grayish with age. The bark of the canes is flaky on the older wood. This is an excellent plant for attracting bees and butterflies.

 
ANECDOTAL
INFORMATION:

This rose was originally identified by Lindley in 1820 from a Chinese painting and was given the name R. microphylla, but the name was changed when it was found that another unrelated European rose had already been given that name.

It was originally collected by W. Kerr. The Chinese called it 'Hai-tong-hong'. The availability of 'Chestnut Rose' is limited.

 
REFERENCES:

Antique Rose Emporium. The Antique Rose Emporium 1988 Catalog. Independence, Texas: Antique Rose Emporium. 1988, p. 82.

Austin, David. The Heritage of the Rose. Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors Club, Ltd.. 1990, p. 364.

Druitt, Liz. The Organic Rose Garden. Dallas, TX: Taylor Publishing Company. 1996, p. 116.

Fagan, Gwen. Roses At The Cape Of Good Hope. Cape Town, South Africa: Breestraat-Publikasies. 1988, pp. 210-211.

Macoboy, Stirling. The Ultimate Rose Book. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc.. 1993, pp. 36-37.

Moody, Mary. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Roses. Portland: Timber Press. 1992, p. 37.

Phillips, Roger and Rix, Martyn. The Quest for the Rose. New York: Random House. 1993, p. 77.

Phillips, Roger and Rix, Martyn. The Random House Book of Roses. New York: Random House. 1988, p. 19, 214.

Thomas, Graham Stuart. The Graham Stuart Thomas Rose Book. Sagaponack, NY: Sagapress, Inc.. 1994, p. 120.

Welch, William C.. Antique Roses for the South. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1990, p. 128.

Welch, William C.. Perennial Garden Color. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1989, p. 202.

Welch, William C. and Grant, Greg.. The Southern Heirloom Garden. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1995, pp. 157-158.