'Lady Banks Yellow'

(Pronounced: LA-dee BAN-ks YELL-ow)

ALSO KNOWN AS:

'Lady Banks Yellow' , R. banksiae lutea , R. banksiae luteaplena , 'Yellow Banksia' , 'Yellow Lady Banks' Rose'

'Lady Banks Yellow'

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The Yellow Lady Banks is an extremely vigorous, once-blooming yellow climber that will happily cover any nearby tree or structure. Its distinctive clusters of yellow flowers in the spring make it easy to identify.

It is thornless and has little fragrance.

 

'Lady Banks Yellow'

[Enlarged Image]

The Yellow Lady Banks Rose produces enormous truses of yellow flowers and can easily cover trees, arbors, or even unwanted sheds. It is a spectacular and unforgetable bloomer for a short period in the spring.

 

 
GENERAL
INFORMATION:

'Lady Banks Yellow' is one of the great classic roses. It is the double yellow form of Lady Banks White. t is slightly more hardy than the White Lady Banks rose, but has little fragrance.

This rose is generally much too large for a small garden, but it will provide spectacular spring displays when allowed to cover an outlying tree or building. The Yellow Lady Banks rose is very long-lived.

 
BOTANICAL
GROUP:

Banksianae

 
GROUP:

OGR

 
CLASS:

Sp

 
SEED
PARENT:

 

POLLEN
PARENT:

 

BREEDER:

 

INTRODUCED:

Introduced from China by J. D. Park for the Horticultural Society of London.  

DATE:

1824 [ England ]  

PLANT SIZE
AND FORM:

Height:    15 '     to    20 '           Width:    8 '     to    12 '



The Yellow Lady Banks rose is a vigorous climber that will happily climb to the top of any nearby tree, fence or arbor. Although the plant is thornless, the long graceful arching canes reach and grow into any adjacent means of support.  

FOLIAGE
DESCRIPTION:

The abundant evergreen foliage is small, lanceolate, and dark green in color. The leaves are very narrow in relation to their length, and always sharp pointed, which seems to be the standard for china rose heritage.

 
FOLIAGE
FRAGRANCE:

None.  

BLOOM
FREQUENCY:

Once. Late Spring. The 'Lady Banks Yellow' rose begins blooming in May in the Texas Hill Country and blooms for approximately 4 weeks.

 
BLOOM
DESCRIPTION:
Flower Size:    .00"      to      .00"           Cluster Size:    5      to      10           Petal Count:    30 to 50          

The blooms of the Yellow Lady Banks rose are small (approximately 1 "e;), cupped, and very double. They grow in clusters that cover the entire plant during the spring bloom period.

 
BLOOM
COLOR:

dy - Dark yellow.

 
COLOR VARIATION:

There is no variation in color and the flowers do not normally fade.  

FRAGRANCE:

sf - Slightly fragrant.

 
HIPS:

None Observed.

 
CLIMATE:

Zones 8 - 9  

CULTURE:

In order to thrive, this rose needs a sheltered sunny location, but it will grow satisfactorily under a wide variety of conditions. It is tolerant of poor soils and is unpalatable to deer.

The ground around the base should be kept free of competing vegetation by mulching. The blooms occur on the second and third year wood, so dead wood and older growth should be pruned out as required.

 
PROPAGATION:

The Yellow Lady Banks rose is readily propagated from cuttings and because it is a species rose, the seeds will produce true specimens.

 
OTHER
CHARACTERISTICS:


    ** Requires sunny location to thrive
    ** Suitable for growing in greenhouses
    ** Availability is limited

Probably the most common of these roses and the most profuse flowering form. The flowers, which are faintly scented, small, double, butter-yellow, appear in clusters and are a joy to behold from spring to early summer.

I am often asked if it is possible to prune a Lady Banks rose to keep it to a moderate size. This is certainly possible, but it may turn out to be an exercise in futility.

 
ANECDOTAL
INFORMATION:

How much to prune? Well, I don't claim to be an expert but I can relate a personal experience that bears on the matter. In 1967, my father and mother moved to a ranch north of Boerne, Texas and were annoyed by the persistent south-east wind.

I planted five Lady Banks roses along a very long fence at the far side of their back yard, hoping that roses would give some spring color and a bit of relief from the wind.

Several springs later, I noticed that a 30' high oak tree next to the 5' high fence had yellow flowers in its uppermost limbs. On closer inspection, it was clear that the Lady Banks had decided that it should grow upward rather than outward.

A few years later I noticed that the trunk of the Lady Banks had grown to about 6" diameter and the canopy of the oak was completely covered with yellow blooms in the spring.

My father, fearing the worst for his beloved oak tree, warmed up his chain saw and proceeded to massacre the Lady Banks, cutting it almost "slick with the ground".

I thought that was the end of the story, but several years later, I noticed yellow flowers again in the spring, covering the entire canopy of the oak tree --- so at least this specimen didn't mind "light pruning". Persistence surely pays off!

 
REFERENCES:

American Rose Society. Modern Roses 10. Shreveport, Louisiana: American Rose Society. 1993, p. 503.

American Rose Society. Modern Roses XI. Shreveport, Louisiana: American Rose Society. 2000, p. 479.

Antique Rose Emporium. The Antique Rose Emporium 1988 Catalog. Independence, Texas: Antique Rose Emporium. 1988, p. 81.

Beales, Peter. Classic Roses. New York: Henry Holt & Company. 1997, p. 109.

Druitt, Liz. The Organic Rose Garden. Dallas, TX: Taylor Publishing Company. 1996, pp. 103, 143-144.