'The Fairy'

(Pronounced: THE FAIR-ee)

ALSO KNOWN AS:

'Fairy' , 'Feerie' , 'The Fairy'

'The Fairy'

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'The Fairy' is a small bush with exceptional dark-green foliage and small (1/2") light pink flowers that occur in large clusters. The Fairy was the first of the groundcover roses.It has a distinct

It has a distinct tendency for its canes to grow horizontally or downward.

 

'The Fairy'

[Enlarged Image]

Almost constantly in bloom, 'The Fairy' makes a spectacular border or low hedge.

 

 
GENERAL
INFORMATION:

'The Fairy' is the first of the groundcover roses, and it tends to spread outward and downward. It produces large trusses of small (3/4" to 1"), light pink, double flowers that fade to almost white in hot weather.

'The Fairy' is very healthy, and tolerates poorer soils and general neglect. The bloom is continuous from April through Christmas. It is an excellent choice for mass plantings and low borders.

 
BOTANICAL
GROUP:

Synstylae

 
GROUP:  
CLASS:

Pol

 
SEED
PARENT:

'Paul Crampel'  

POLLEN
PARENT:

'Lady Gay'  

BREEDER:

Bentall  

INTRODUCED:

'The Fairy' was introduced by J. A. Bentall in 1932 in England.  

DATE:

1932 [ England ]  

PLANT SIZE
AND FORM:

Height:    3 '     to    4 '           Width:    2 '     to    4 '



'The Fairy' was the first of the "ground cover" roses. It is a small plant with a downward spreading habit. It is extremely thorny. The Fairy is ideally suited for low hedge border applications.  

FOLIAGE
DESCRIPTION:

The foliage is small, approximating the size of boxwood leaves, mid-green, serrated, and very glossy.

 
FOLIAGE
FRAGRANCE:

None.  

BLOOM
FREQUENCY:

C - Continuous. 'The Fairy' starts blooming a little later than most roses, usually by mid-May. Once it starts, 'The Fairy' is almost continually in bloom until frost forces it into winter dormancy.

 
BLOOM
DESCRIPTION:
Flower Size:    .75"      to      1.00"           Cluster Size:    15      to      30           Petal Count:    35 to 40          

'The Fairy' buds are spherical (3/8") and dark pink. The buds open to medium pink blooms that occur in large heavy clusters of very small, very double flowers (1" to 1-1/2").

 
BLOOM
COLOR:

lp - Light Pink. 'The Fairy' blooms open medium pink and fade to a very light pink. In the summer heat, they fade to a blush white.

 
COLOR VARIATION:

The flowers fade to near white in the summer and as the blooms age.  

FRAGRANCE:

NF - Not Fragrant. 'The Fairy'has very little if any fragrance.

 
HIPS:

Orange-red; Globular; 3/8". The hips are globose, small (3/8") and orange red. However, the display of hips is normally minimal.

 
CLIMATE:

Zones 4 - 9  

CULTURE:

Although it does not sucker, the canes will root wherever they touch the ground. Since the habit is downward, an unattended 'Fairy' Rose will tend to spread laterally in all directions.

'The Fairy' is very disease resistant, tolerates poor soils and thrives in full sun or partial shade. It is a good specimen for bedding or planting in groups, and can also be planted as a ground cover or container plant.

 
PROPAGATION:

'The Fairy' is very easy to propagate from cuttings.

 
OTHER
CHARACTERISTICS:


    ** Tolerant of shade
    ** Tolerant of poorer soils
    ** Good for bedding or mass plantings
    ** Suitable for hedging and fence rows
    ** Suitable for growing into trees
    ** Suitable for growing in pots
    ** Suitable for use as a ground cover
    ** Widely Availabile

Clusters of 'The Fairy' blooms make good cut flowers.

 
ANECDOTAL
INFORMATION:

I obtained my first 'Fairy' rose as a cutting from a bush that had survived for many years without benefit of ertilizer, water, or attention.

The cuttings rooted immediately and from them I have propagated hundreds of plants to use on the outside of a rose circle and along walks.

Some of these plants are under oak trees and some in full sun, but sun or shade they all perform well.

They were planted without soil amendment or fertilizer in the native and very shallow black clay crud of the Texas hill country and have thrived with only a modest amount of supplemental water.

The plants are gradually spreading as canes touching the ground take root, and periodically they need to be trimmed and the volunteer plants dug up and potted.

'The Fairy' is a very satisfactory rose, but it has one fault: it bites! It is among the thorniest of the Polyantha roses and its thorns are exceedingly sharp. Pruning and other chores around the Fairy should be undertaken with care.

 
REFERENCES:

American Rose Society. Modern Roses 10. Shreveport, Louisiana: American Rose Society. 1993, p. 602.

American Rose Society. Modern Roses XI. Shreveport, Louisiana: American Rose Society. 2000, p. 585.

Antique Rose Emporium. The Antique Rose Emporium 1988 Catalog. Independence, Texas: Antique Rose Emporium. 1988, p. 56.

Beales, Peter. Classic Roses. New York: Henry Holt & Company. 1997, pp. 25, 26, 56, 67, 84, 304.

Druitt, Liz. The Organic Rose Garden. Dallas, TX: Taylor Publishing Company. 1996, pp. 58, 95, 105, 131-132.

Taylor. (Maggie Oster, Consulting Ed.r). Taylor's Pocket Guide to Old-fashioned Roses. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co.. 1989, p. 44.

Welch, William C.. Antique Roses for the South. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1990, pp. 44, 64, 121, 171.

Welch, William C.. Perennial Garden Color. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1989, pp. 225, 238-239.