'Cornelia'

(Pronounced: cor-KNEEL-eea)

ALSO KNOWN AS:

'Cornelia'

'Cornelia'

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'Cornelia' can be trained as a moderate climber or, left to its own devices, it will form a 4' high by 7' wide shrub with graceful arching canes.

 

'Cornelia'

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The buds and flowers of Cornelia are very distinctive. The buds are very small (3/8" diameter) and coral-coppery-raspberry colored. The flowers open double and form flat rossettes with 3 or 4 rows of petals.

Their general shape is reminiscent of 'Bayse's Blueberry', and they often have distinctive patches of raspberry near the large area of golden stamens.

 

'Cornelia'

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The petals frequently have small color variations including splotches of raspberry.

 

'Cornelia'

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The combination of the beautiful fragrant flowers and the raspberry colored buds is quite striking.

 

 
GENERAL
INFORMATION:

'Cornelia' is a vigorous climbing Hybrid Musk rose with long gracefully arching canes and small coral buds that open to distinctive small (2"), double, apricot-pink flowers with prominent golden stamens.

The buds and flowers of Cornelia are very distinctive. The buds are very small (3/8" diameter) and coral-coppery-raspberry colored. The flowers open double and form flat rossettes with 3 or 4 rows of petals. The growth habit is climbing and vigorous

 
BOTANICAL
GROUP:

Synstylae

 
GROUP:

Pemberton

 
CLASS:

H Msk

 
SEED
PARENT:

Unknown  

POLLEN
PARENT:

Unknown  

BREEDER:

Pemberton  

INTRODUCED:

'Cornelia' was introduced by Pemberton (England) in 1925.  

DATE:

1925 [ England ]  

PLANT SIZE
AND FORM:

Height:    8 '     to    12 '           Width:    4 '     to    8 '



The natural form of 'Cornelia' is a large spreading shrub 4' high and 7' wide with graceful arching canes. If the canes are thinned and trained, it will make a moderate climber, reaching heights of 8' to 12'.  

FOLIAGE
DESCRIPTION:

The foliage is bronze tinted, glossy, and leathery.

 
FOLIAGE
FRAGRANCE:

None.  

BLOOM
FREQUENCY:

C - Continuous. 'Cornelia' starts blooming late spring (May in the Texas Hill Country) and repeats throughout the growing season.

 
BLOOM
DESCRIPTION:
Flower Size:    2.00"      to      2.50"           Cluster Size:    5      to      7           Petal Count:    30 to 35          

'Cornelia' buds and flowers are very distinctive. The buds are very small (3/8" diameter. The flowers open double and form flat rossettes with 3 or 4 rows of petals.

 
BLOOM
COLOR:

mp - Medium Pink. 'Cornelia' small coral buds open to distinctive apricot-pink flowers with prominent golden stamens.

 
COLOR VARIATION:

None.  

FRAGRANCE:

MF - Moderately Fragrant. Cornelia has a moderate sweet-musk fragrance.

 
HIPS:

None observed.

 
CLIMATE:

Zones 6 - 9  

CULTURE:

'Cornelia' tolerates bright shade and poor soils. It is hardy to -20 degrees Fahrenheit, and very disease resistant.

'Cornelia' should be pruned to remove excess canes, but never more than 1/3 of the wood.

 
PROPAGATION:

'Cornelia' may be propagated from cuttings or by ground layering.

 
OTHER
CHARACTERISTICS:


    ** Tolerant of shade
    ** Tolerant of poorer soils
    ** Suitable for hedging and fence rows
    ** Suitable for growing into trees
    ** Suitable for growing in pots
    ** Suitable for use as a climbing or pillar rose
    ** Widely Availabile

'Cornelia' spring and fall displays are outstanding.

 
ANECDOTAL
INFORMATION:

'Cornelia' is particularly nice when allowed to cascade over a low retaining wall or bank.

 
REFERENCES:

American Rose Society. Modern Roses 10. Shreveport, Louisiana: American Rose Society. 1993, p. 112.

American Rose Society. Modern Roses XI. Shreveport, Louisiana: American Rose Society. 2000, p. 101.

Antique Rose Emporium. The Antique Rose Emporium 1988 Catalog. Independence, Texas: Antique Rose Emporium. 1988, p. 73.

Beales, Peter. Classic Roses. New York: Henry Holt & Company. 1997, pp. 25, 66, 257.

Druitt, Liz. The Organic Rose Garden. Dallas, TX: Taylor Publishing Company. 1996, pp. 100, 102, 123.

Taylor. (Maggie Oster, Consulting Ed.r). Taylor's Pocket Guide to Old-fashioned Roses. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co.. 1989, p. 49.

Welch, William C.. Antique Roses for the South. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1990, pp. 44, 174-175.

Welch, William C.. Perennial Garden Color. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1989, pp. 227, 238-239.